Visual/Media Arts
LITTLE MEN
August 5, 2016
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Brooklyn gets another shout-out out when 13 year-old Jake’s (Theo Taplitz) grandfather dies. His family pulls up stakes and travels across the bridge from Manhattan to Brooklyn. At first displaced, Jake soon meets the affable Tony (Michael Barbieri) who lives with a single mother Leonor (Paulina Garcia) a dressmaker from Chile who rents her store from Jake’s parents—Brian (Greg Kinnear) and Kathy (Jennifer Ehle).

Trouble ensues when Brian, a struggling actor and Kathy, a psychotherapist, demand a steep rent hike. A feud ignites. At first oblivious to the back biting parents, the young boys proceed in the beautiful sunlight of their friendship. But soon, their parents’ animosities creep into their playing field. Directed by Ira Sachs, it sings of lost innocence and adults in turmoil.

EYE ON THE ARTS, NY -- Celia Ipiotis

GLEASON
July 29, 2016
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An inspirational film directed b Clay Tweel, follows the New Orleasn NFL defensive back, player Steve Gleason and his journey from an ALS diagnosis to a brighter future for all people with neurological disorders.

Married and preparing for his first child, Gleason received the ALS verdict along with a life expectancy of two to five years. Through personal video journals and a fierce schedule of globe trotting and great adventures, a human being of many dimensions emerges and proves that through great strife comes amazing courage and goodness.

EYE ON THE ARTS, NY -- Celia Ipiotis

TALENT HAS HUNGER
July 27, 2016
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Between all the cultural competition shows on TV—the film “Talent has Hunger” unveils the actual work ethic and passion required to succeed—in any field. Based on the teaching of of Paul Katz at his New England Conservatory of highly gifted students, it tracks the routine that makes artists out of students.

In Josh Aronson’s film, young artists are treated to a magnificent array of insights into the cello. Like a chef, Katz combines a completely different set of ingredients for each student, making certain they are stirred to create the perfect balance.

EYE ON THE ARTS, NY -- Celia Ipiotis

LIFE ANIMATED
July 1, 2016
If only every child had Owen Suskind’s parents and older brother, then the world would be a more hopeful place for all. A seemingly well adjusted child, Owen stopped speaking at the age of three. Distraught, his parents consulted one doctor after another, desperately trying to reach him. The father, Ron Siskin, the New York Times best seller, and his wife, were determined to find solutions.

Throughout his life, Owen found solace and discovered life-lessons in Disney classics like The Little Mermaid and The Lion King. Very slowly, over time, Owen’s silence began to find words. Of course, this did not happen easily, Owen has access to some of the finest instructors, physical therapists and psychologists, on top of parents who breathed their own lives into him.

Impossible as it sounds, the Suskinds worked very hard to keep Owen mainstreamed in school. After Owen begins elementary school, everyone realizes that his first words are quotes from Disney films. Remarkably, Owen’s winning personality makes him an adored student body member, and he finds his own club of people sharing his infatuation for Disney films.

Much of the archival film is shot by Mr. Suskind with his own film camera, sort of a documentation of his children growing up. The film itself picks up later in Owen’s life and shows him leaving his parents’ house for an assisted living situation. It’s thrilling to see this young man actually enter his own apartment. And once in the unit, he meets a young lady who he dates for a bit.

Roger Ross Williams’ documentary offers hope. Hope that Owen will not only find a way to live with guidance, but also, find love. However, there will never be any love greater than that demonstrated by his parents.

EYE ON THE ARTS, NY -- Celia Ipiotis

LOBSTER
May 12, 2016
LOBSTER Ancient religious believe in the reincarnation of people as animals, but in Yorgos Lanthimos’ weird film “Lobster” society mandates that people of marriageable age who divorce must find a mate in 45 days. If they do not find “true love” the penalty is to chose an animal and be released in the woods as that animal for the rest of your life.

Colin Farrell (David) arrives at the compound, which looks like Mohonk or some other large inn backing into the woods. When the woman asks about his preference, David requests the body of a lobster.

This surrealistic community is populated by stilted people who will never hook-up, and others desperate to marry regardless of their feelings for the other person. Much like a benign summer camp routine, everyone meets for activities and meals giving potential partners in constant view. One of the many quirky touches forces the hotel residents to listen to music on earphones, but everyone is listening to same traces so if they can dance with likely partners.

Outside the compound, a renegade group looks for “lost” camp members. Bows and arrows slung on their shoulders, the woodland “loners” prey on the regimented members of the hotel. Of course, their “captives” can love anyone, listen to any music, read what they want, but one thing they can’t do is leave. So once, again, society incarcerates. Led by the attractive, but scary Lea Seydoux, she’s rebelling from her well-to-do family, while simultaneously trying to soak them for support. Like many, she’s a bundle of contradictions.

Both are controlling societies, deciding on how you will live, how many children per family—the big government. There’s an aspect of hunger games and Orwell’s 1984. Flat images, and clear colors give the film a video palette. Even the lush green woods has an air of unrealness to it.

The excellent cast, led by Farrell and Rachel Weisz (the short sighted woman), unravel a story that’s both harrowing and witty.

EYE ON THE ARTS, NY -- Celia Ipiotis

NY FILM FESTIVAL 53 Edition
August 17, 2015
The NY Film Festival returns for the 53rd edition at Lincoln Center with 26 features including a world premiere of Steven Spielberg's Bridge of Spies and films from Chantal Akerman, Arnaud Desplechin, Todd Haynes, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Rebecca Miller, Michael Moore, Nanni Moretti, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Jia Zhangke, and more.

Four world premieres will brighten up the slate: Steven Spielberg’s Bridge of Spies, starring Tom Hanks and Mark Rylance in the Cold War story of the 1962 exchange of a U-2 pilot for a Soviet agent; Laura Israel’s Don’t Blink: Robert Frank, a documentary portrait of the great photographer and filmmaker; as well as the previously announced Opening Night selection The Walk and Closing Night selection Miles Ahead.

Although it feels like every director in the universe has appeared as part of the NYFF, this year a few will be unveiled for the very first time from Cannes: Best Director Hou Hsiao-hsien’s The Assassin; Todd Haynes’s Carol, starring Best Actress winner Rooney Mara; Stéphane Brizé’s The Measure of a Man, starring Best Actor winner Vincent Lindon; Jury Prize winner The Lobster; Un Certain Regard Best Director Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Journey to the Shore; and Un Certain Talent Prize winner Corneliu Porumboiu’s The Treasure.

Fort those who like a little controversy with their film viewing there's Michael Moore with Where To Invade Next, which takes a hard and surprising look at the state of our nation from a fresh perspective; NYFF mainstay Hong Sangsoo, presents Right Now, Wrong Then, about the relationship between a middle-aged art-film director and a fledgling artist; and French director Arnaud Desplechin, who is back with the funny and heartrending story of young love My Golden Days, starring Mathieu Amalric and newcomers Quentin Dolmaire and Lou Roy-Lecollinet.

In directorial debuts: Don Cheadle with Miles Ahead, a portrait of the artist Miles Davis (played by the Cheadle), during his crazy days in New York in the late-70s, and Thomas Bidegain with Les Cowboys, a film reminiscent of John Ford’s The Searchers, in which a father searches for his missing daughter across a two-decade timespan—pre- to post-9/11—from Europe to Afghanistan and back.

Several titles also add a comedic layer to this year’s lineup, including Rebecca Miller’s Maggie’s Plan, a New York romantic comedy starring Greta Gerwig, Ethan Hawke, Julianne Moore, Bill Hader, and Maya Rudolph; Mia Madre from Nanni Moretti, starring John Turturro; Michel Gondry’s Microbe & Gasoline, a new handmade-SFX comedy that follows two adolescent misfits who build a house on wheels and travel across France; and Corneliu Porumboiu’s The Treasure, a modern-day fable in which two men look for buried treasure in their backyard. 9/25-10/11.
EYE ON THE ARTS, NY -- Celia Ipiotis

DANCE ON CAMERA 42 Edition:FILM SOCIETY OF LINCOLN CENTER
January 10, 2014
The Film Society of Lincoln Center and Dance Films Association have returned with a mixed menu of dance films that feature one of the New York City's major dance educators, Martha Hill stretching across categories to horse ballets and ice dancing. Dance notables are featured among them Pina Baasch and Paul Taylor. This is a fine way to view the multiplicity of dance professionals from the documentaries to dances designed specifically for the camera.
Walter Reade Theater
1/31-2/4
Friday, January 31
1:00PM THE UNSEEN SEQUENCE (69m) w/PAS (3m)
3:30PM TAP OR DIE (62m) w/ Tap, Tap, Tap (8m)
4:00PM STUDENT FILM COMPETITION (60m)
5:00PM FREE PANEL DISCUSSION: CURRICULUM FOR DANCE FILM
6:15PM ALL THIS CAN HAPPEN (50m) w/CROSSWALK (4m), DERVISHES (3m)
8:00PM OPENING NIGHT – MISS HILL: MAKING DANCE MATTER (80m) w/Homegoings The Dance (5m)
Saturday, February 1
1:00PM HÄSTDANS på HOVDALA (60m) w/CARRY IT ON (19m)
3:30PM SHORTS PROGRAM (72m)
5:00PM FREE PANEL DISCUSSION: SEBASTIAN RICH: BULLETS TO BROADWAY
6:15PM ICE THEATRE OF NY w/panel discussion (95m)
8:30PM YAK FILMS (90m)
Sunday, February 2
1:15PM THE FABULOUS ICE AGE (73m)
3:30PM DANCE & COMMUNITY SHORTS (72m)
6:00PM LA PASSION NOUREEV (56m) w/OUBLIER LE TEMPS (5m), LOST IN MOTION (3m)
8:00PM GISELLE (105m)
Monday, February 3
3:30PM PRIMA (57m) w/ME, STORY OF A PERFORMER (8m)
6:00PM SECUNDARIA (96m) w/TIZZY (3m)
8:30PM THE MAN BEHIND THE THRONE (58m) w/IT’S A FEELING – DANCING WITH JEFF SELBY (9m)
Tuesday, February 4
3:00PM HOW LIKE AN ANGEL (46m) w/WIDOW (12m)
5:00PM FREE PANEL DISCUSSION: MEET THE ARTIST WITH JONATHAN DEMME
6:00PM STORY/TIME 3D (70m) w/panel discussion (40m)
9:00PM CLOSING NIGHT – PAUL TAYLOR: CREATIVE DOMAIN (82m) w/STUDENT FILM WINNER (15m)




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